REVIEW: Miss Juneteenth [2020]

Stop worrying about THEM. There’s nothing wholly original about the narrative within Channing Godfrey Peoples‘ feature directorial debut Miss Juneteenth. You can probably rattle off ten films right now that depict a down-on-their-luck parent desperately trying to do right by the child they had too young to ever do right by themselves. These parents are so driven to ensure their kid doesn’t follow in their footsteps that they ultimately push them away—refusing to see their son or daughter’s true self beneath a projection of what they wished they had become…

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TIFF18 REVIEW: Monsters and Men [2018]

Six dudes for one guy. The conversation surrounding Black Lives Matter is (and should be) about the victims of police violence who’ve yet to see any killers in blue face real consequences. It’s not about saying their lives matter more than anyone else, but that they matter at all. Because if you look at the headlines it’s easy to wonder if people think they do—especially the police. Just like nursery rhymes in classrooms have begun teaching youngsters how to stay safe during school shootings, many parents of POC children are…

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REVIEW: 42 [2013]

“He discombobulated the man” Much like the origin of forty-two as Douglas Adams’ “Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything” being nothing more than a joke—an ordinary, smallish number he chose—the fact Brooklyn Dodgers first-baseman Jackie Robinson wore it on his back simply derives from it being stitched on the jersey he was given. Baseball is a numbers driven game with statistics at the forefront of how players are drafted and utilized on the field and writer/director Brian Helgeland’s 42 follows suit with its timelines, batting…

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TIFF11 REVIEW: Shame [2011]

“Blue or green?” Three years after their first collaboration—and the director’s debut film—Steve McQueen and star Michael Fassbender return with the viscerally intense Shame. To call a movie assured to receive an NC-17 rating more mainstream than their previous Hunger is insane, but it’s true. Whereas that film took a more formal approach to the medium, leaving us in a visually stunning world without introducing the lead character until about a third of the way in, Shame definitely has more of a narrative voice. With that said, however, McQueen’s improved…

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