REVIEW: Lost + Found [2018]

Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven. Why shouldn’t Satan (Jennifer Plotzke) be given a starring role in the telling of Paradise? God allowed her to wreak havoc on mankind by seducing Eve (Pia Haddad) with an apple of knowledge. He left us behind as silly creatures lost in the throes of love without a conscious desire for more. With evil came understanding. With pain came meaning to joy. We wouldn’t be what we are for worse or better without Satan’s hand and thus maybe we should give…

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REVIEW: How Do You Type a Broken Heart [2018]

You have to fight. Addiction is a tough topic to do justice with in a short film. I don’t mean that as a commentary on duration, but honesty. The last thing you want to do is have a piece meant to conjure introspection and drama feel like a PSA commissioned by the same companies that supply the drug due to court-ordered awareness laws. So you have to find a balance between the subject matter and the emotionality of the issue. You have to find a way to let characters breathe…

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REVIEW: Entanglement [2018]

Should I have brought you flowers too? **POTENTIAL SPOILERS** There’s a great moment in Jeremiah Kipp‘s short film Entanglement wherein Frank (Lukas Hassel) explains to the second party of a random sexual encounter assumedly organized online (Robin Rose Singer‘s Jenny) how he used to “see” his ex-girlfriend everywhere after they broke up. Screenwriter Joseph Fiorillo has his character describe the epiphany experienced upon realizing this anxious paranoia wasn’t a matter of his going insane. Frank wasn’t projecting this specific woman onto random strangers because he was consumed by her memory.…

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REVIEW: Black Wake [2018]

I’m the prophet and you’re the messenger. The amount of zombie properties flooding the market these days has created an unavoidable sense of fatigue. As a result artists have begun turning certain aspects on their heads in order to differentiate one vision from any other. Sometimes this means crossing genres, manufacturing elaborate new mythologies, or playing with aesthetic. Jeremiah Kipp‘s Black Wake attempts to do all three as it utilizes a found footage format to reveal a calamity that’s more invasion than viral apocalypse. There’s still a horde of blood-hungry…

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REVIEW: Pickup [2016]

“I’m waiting for you” Self-destruction is hardly a new concept. It’s simply more accessible now. Before the internet you had to feed your addictive nature in the physical world with monetary compensation rather than moral. Now, however, anything you want is a button push away. Social media and numerous applications meant to connect us in ways we never dreamed aren’t always altruistic and those using them are hardly one hundred percent above board. You can pretend you’re someone you’re not before you even meet someone new. You can construct a…

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REVIEW: Sound/Vision [2016]

“I continued my studies and the music stopped” Music is a powerful force—a sensory cause leading towards an effect of memory, emotion, and spirit. It brings us together beyond labels of race, gender, or religion with a commonality able to strip us down to our purest humanity. And as Ludwig van Beethoven proved through his timeless classics (some of which he wasn’t able to fully hear due to an onset of deafness), each note has the capacity to hit our heart and soul when our ears fail to comprehend them.…

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REVIEW: Berenice [2014]

“I wanted it to hurt” One chapter from the horror anthology Creepers, Jeremiah Kipp‘s adaptation of Edgar Allen Poe‘s disturbing short story Berenice finds itself hindered by what I can only guess was a shoestring budget. A director who has excelled at creating stunning pitch-black tone with ambiguously delicious mystery in carefully composed thrillers, this twenty-minute horror finds itself delivering more unintentional laughs than frightening scares. The over-the-top and often amateurish acting does no favors and its brightly lit digital presentation of footage with a do-it-yourself sensibility puts the artifice…

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REVIEW: The Minions [2014]

“I shouldn’t have went there” Director Jeremiah Kipp once again amps up the mood with his latest short The Minions to follow his similarly aesthetically-constructed The Days God Slept. From the camera angles catching his actors’ expressions in a way that cultivates mystery, the score pulsing along with the imagery as though everything is set to its beat, and the dark subject matter underlying its elaborate masking of reality in the supernatural, William’s (Lukas Hassel) nightmare gradually becomes ours. Scripted by Joseph Fiorillo—and supposedly based on a true story of…

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VIDEO: Aaron David Gleason’s “Mastermind”

Director Jeremiah Kipp—who sent me his impressive short film The Days God Slept (review) last year—has just released a music video he created for Aaron David Gleason‘s new song “Mastermind”. A mood piece of aggression with a cast that includes The Princess Bride‘s Chris Sarandon and the musician’s mother—of Boogie Nights fame—Joanna Gleason, Kipp gives us multiple characters in rhythmic cross-cuts and split screen as the music plays. Check it out below:

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REVIEW: The Days God Slept [2013]

“Things are both precisely and not at all as they appear” It’s often us—not the people we care about—who we hide our past secrets from in order to get through the day. Our actions—whether the result of youth, stupidity, or complete and utter desire—are what define us; they are what make us into unique individuals roaming this earth with identical quests for happiness to be fulfilled in ways exclusive to our own body and soul. To open oneself to another is to peel away years of isolating guilt and regret,…

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