REVIEW: Letters to Juliet [2010]

“And I curse her moustache” Let’s just say director Gary Winick’s track record is nothing to be inspired by—13 Going on 30 and Bride Wars amongst those he helmed. But, while he brings tripe like that to fruition, his producing credits include a few gems like Starting Out in the Evening and, a personal favorite, Pieces of April. Watching the trailer for his latest, Letters to Juliet, one can almost see what is a hybrid of the two types. Don’t get me wrong, there is a ton of romantic, true…

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REVIEW: The Limits of Control [2009]

“Two espressos in separate cups” What do you get when you pair a minimalist such as Jim Jarmusch with a genius cinematographer in Christopher Doyle? The answer is a stunning work of art, starkly beautiful in its compositions and intelligently obtuse in its storytelling. Much like the director’s other films for which I’ve had the pleasure of seeing, The Limits of Control is about one man’s spiritual journey. Sometimes his movies have a more straightforward focus in plot, (Ghost Dog or Broken Flowers), but other instances are more metaphysical and…

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REVIEW: Blindness [2008]

“Like someone turned on all the lights” I truthfully don’t know what to think about Fernando Meirelles’ new film Blindness. Based on a novel and adapted by Don McKellar, (the thief in the film if you’re interested, and also Brad in the fantastic Waydowntown), the story actually left me a little cold. This thing is tense, don’t get me wrong, and edge of your seat in multiple moments, but by the end I was a tad surprised at how innocuous it all was. Maybe I am demeaning the story too…

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REVIEW: Babel [2006]

“The brightest lights on the darkest nights” The final piece to Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo Arriaga’s unofficial trilogy has finally reached theatres. Babel is a sprawling tale spanning multiple countries and languages as a lone gunshot leaves reverberations throughout the world, interfering with the lives of many people who at first glance are seemingly unrelated. These two men, director and writer respectively, have crafted two previous masterpieces with themes of love and sorrow, pain and redemption. From Amores Perros and 21 Grams, we are shown a steady progression of…

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REVIEW: The Science of Sleep [2006]

“Will you marry me when you’re seventy and have nothing to lose?” Michel Gondry’s first foray into that of solo writer/director has finally been released outside the festival circuit. The Science of Sleep was created without the help of writing collaborator Charlie Kaufmann whose scripts for Human Nature and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind were brought to the screen by the visual prowess of Gondry. There is a void apparent as the story is not as tight and coherent, (if you can call a Kaufmann script either), as his…

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