REVIEW: Cherry [2021]

You don’t have to ever be sorry for the way you feel. There’s a heavy scene towards the beginning of Anthony and Joe Russo‘s Cherry wherein an obviously traumatized Emily (Ciara Bravo) subconsciously botches an attempt at saying goodbye for good to her boyfriend (Tom Holland‘s nameless protagonist). The script (written by Angela Russo-Otstot and Jessica Goldberg) very quickly glossed over the young woman’s domestic abuse-created PTSD that has her ready to flee after he tells her he loves her (treating it more as a catalyst for why he joins…

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REVIEW: I Used to Go Here [2020]

You’re like our forefather. This was the week when Kate’s (Gillian Jacobs) dreams were supposed to come true. Her debut novel was releasing, her wedding was on the horizon, and a nationwide book tour was about to commence. Everything she worked for since college had finally bore fruit and you couldn’t blame her if she smiled with relief at a job well done. Except she never gets that chance. She receives a call from her publisher weeks after her engagement was cancelled to hear the tour has been too. Kate’s…

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REVIEW: Blood Quantum [2020]

You don’t name things that eat you. A Red Crow reservation citizen in Jeff Barnaby‘s Blood Quantum asks the question of whether they as indigenous people are immune to a vicious zombie outbreak that’s taken over North America or have simply been forgotten by the Earth during its cleanse. It’s easy to understand such a defeatist attitude considering the world at-large has done the latter for centuries. Colonialists slaughtered, infected, and cordoned off natives from lands they sought and stole, continuing to isolate them even today onto their tiny swaths…

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REVIEW: The Miseducation of Cameron Post [2018]

There’s no hiding from God. “Separation of church and state” has always fascinated me since the only consistency within is the ability to pick and choose when and how it’s enforced. We’re the “land of the free” and therefore shouldn’t impose certain laws and safeties upon religious communities trying to practice their faith. But when a political power finds utility in prejudice and animosity against one religion to turn its own into the very platform on which it runs, that’s okay. It’s funny too that these scenarios deal directly with…

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REVIEW: The Revenant [2015]

“As long as you can still grab a breath … you fight” If we’re to go by the setting of Michael Punke‘s novel The Revenant on which Mark L. Smith based his script—director Alejandro González Iñárritu gets a co-writing credit after coming onboard—the year is 1822 and the Central American frontier is loaded with fur traders pillaging Native American land, animals, and women. Captain Andrew Henry (Domhnall Gleeson) leads a band of men under the authority of his employer to procure pelts and return to camp with Hugh Glass (Leonardo…

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